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Chefs Need to Cook up their CV’s for Global Opportunities.

Posted on: 13.08.2013    04:59:33

Global Chef

Why are brilliant chefs so often frustrated?

Why do you find great chefs in the most unlikely of places?

Chefs are great moaners and complainers. Temper tantrums go with the territory and loyalty levels are low because Chefs are often undervalued by Employers.

Now, what is the root of the problem? It is the chefs. While they will use all the skills at their disposal to serve up a classic meal for you they do not pay attention to the ingredients that make up their personal profile, that goes a lot further than a simple CV.

Sure you get the exceptions. Chefs from North America are particularly good at marketing themselves and have supporting websites showcasing their talent. Unsurprisingly most of these top chefs are earning US$100,000 +

But the average chef  underestimates the importance of  marketing themselves so let’s run through a check list of what is needed to get an international job:

  • Everyone needs a CV or resume, it tells us what you have done. What to include? It shouldn’t just be a regurgitation of your life history and there are no prizes for length. It should focus on your accomplishments not just history and the last 5-10 years is the most important. We are not interested in educational awards other than certified trade certification and/or degrees. Include computer competency and language skills. Two or three pages are enough.
  • Now, if you are reading this, ensure you spell and grammar check your CV and get a friend or relative to check it for you. You’d be surprised at the garbage we get served up with as so called CV’s. In the digital age they don’t come with coffee or fat stains but that is how they seem. Remember, you never get a second chance to make a first impression.
  • Chefs have so many advantages over other professionals as the trade is in part visual but rarely are we sent pictures of dishes that have been created by the applicant. What a missed opportunity? The best host their creations on personal websites that can be created easily and once done will act as a central resource for the future. Working smart, not hard is the way forward.
  • If looking internationally any Chef has to overcome the inability to speak to someone face to face. In Australia 95% of chef’s jobs are given through a combination of a personal video and Skype interviews. A personal video is really helpful and we never look for a masterpiece. It helps employers judge your accent, how you present yourself and to learn more about you.
  • Paperwork, the bête noire of chefs. Of all the professions we deal with Chefs are the worse in an international context. Chefs simply hate paperwork. Without paperwork you are not going to succeed in getting an international job as most jurisdictions require a visa and have immigration laws that need to be respected. The Middle East is relatively painless in visa terms but Canada is not advised as it is such a long winded process. Australia sits in between. Unless you have qualifying citizenship you can forget about the European Union and the USA at this time.

So there you have it Mr Chef. You have all the ingredients that make up YOU. BUT you need to serve them up professionally. We can help get you to be seen but you are responsible for the ingredients. We will work with you on the menu presentation.

Quality chefs are always in global demand but you need to be mobile to take advantage of the best offers. The top jobs in the Middle East are the best paid but the area is not for everyone. Australia has demand all over the country from pub chef through sous chef with over 100 Executive Chef positions currently open, mainly on the East coast.

To gain worldwide exposure Chefs interested in working internationally should register their CV and complete a personal profile.

 

Author: Chris Slay

 

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